Comic book Mondays: The Losers

 the-losers-book-one-fictionandflowers.wordpress.com-andy-diggle-jock

I have absolutely no compunctions about teenage girls reading Twilight. After all, the only reason I didn’t jump from Twilight to Wuthering Heights or Sense and Sensibility was that I’d already read them and not been overly impressed.

Why is this relevant to comics? Because, dear Reader, in much the same way as thousands of teenage girls discovered great classic romance through… less great romance, I discovered comics because of Chris Evans.

The first comic I ever bought was The Losers. It’s not the sort of thing I’d normally pick up off the shelf, in novel form or in comic book form. It’s gritty, and political; the characters are cynical for all they’re incredibly loyal to one another; Jock’s art is very noir and shadowed. Not really the sort of thing I go for at all. But I watched the movie, and I loved it, and as soon as I realised there was more I was on eBay looking for it. I had to pay the same amount for shipping as I did for the actual books, but that was still about half of what I’d pay here (oh, curse the Colonies!).

The Losers is the kind of comic book you can give a non-comic book reader, expecially one who loves dorky action movies, and they’ll love it. The first thing that struck me about reading The Losers was how true the movie had been to the book. You’re dumped straight into an action sequence that was lifted whole into the film, and for all that Cougar is more solid and Pooch has an adorable paunch and Aisha is considerably more spiky and terrifying, I can see their film selves in the comic book. If anything, it only made the slight differences more jarring – I’m following a panel about a Cougar who’s a little stockier and more haunted than the one in the movie, but I can hear Óscar Jaenada’s voice saying his lines.

Diggle’s dialogue is short and punchy. The characters talk like they’re in an action movie, just with added swearing and a touch more exposition than in the film, which is necessary for a story that’s being told in a different order. There’s an interview with Diggle and Jock where they comment on the bizarreness of having their story lifted straight from the book into the film. It’s great to read, given how pleased they were with the look and feel of the film – especially as I’m someone who came from the movie to the comic.

One of the things I love about the comic is the colouring. Jock’s panels have two or three main colours that allow the eye to slip from action to action without getting caught on the scenery. And yet, of course, when you suddenly find yourself at the end of a double-page spread, you take a moment and a deep breath and go over it again, slowly, because it’s just so lovely to look at.

If you love actio movies, I highly recommend The Losers. It’s a dorky action movie in comic-book format.

jensen-the-losers-fictionandflowers.wordpress.com-movie-poster-chris-evans

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Comic book Mondays: The Losers

  1. As it’s a fairly hot topic at the moment I couldn’t help but notice your comment about things being cheaper to deliver from the states than to buy the same products in Australia. How, in a global Internet literate age, does it make any sense for companies to overcharge or try and streamline products to Australia. I’m specifically talking about cultural products here, why oh why does Australia have such a high download rate? Really?! Why do you think? This has been an issue for a while and it baffles me as to how slow the producers of mass media consumption, are to catch on.

    • It baffles me as well, because at the end of the day, there’s no excuse for it. Not only that, but in some instances companies are actually stifling their markets here because their products are only within the financial reach of the few and the dedicated – I’m thinking in particular of Warhammer. I know a decent amount of it has to do with the amount of extra hands goods in Aus have to pass through to get to the consumer, but still. Ugh.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s